Internal Medicine

Miao J. Hua, MD, PhD Miao J. Hua, MD, PhD (2 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Mount Sinai Hospital


Miao Jenny Hua is a first year internal medicine resident at the Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan. She also has a PhD in anthropology from the University of Chicago. Her dissertation on the integrated Chinese and Western health care system in China took her to spend over a year in Wuhan, China from 2016-2017. Since the lockdown of Wuhan on January 23, 2020, she has been in regular communication with her physician friends at the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic.




Routine Infection Prevention Will Not Contain COVID-19

As an internal medicine resident working at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, COVID-19 has taken over our workroom conversations as the number of new cases enters exponential growth. As an anthropologist who lived in Wuhan for a year and has regularly kept in touch with physicians there since the city was placed under lockdown on January 23, 2020, COVID-19 has proved to be an unprecedented crisis.

July 1, Take 2: Navigating the Transition from Intern to Senior Resident

You could feel it in the air, in how the nurses double-checked the orders, how the attendings’ notes bloated in size, and even in how the patients, despite their general lack of knowledge towards the inner workings of the hospital, exuded mild apprehension. It was day one of the academic year, the day that the new interns — my new interns — started.

Treat Me If You Can: DNR versus Comfort Measures Only

Caffeine’s effect waned, stomachs rumbled, attention spans faded after rounding on nine acutely ill patients on university wards. It was nearing lunch. I was the senior resident, so I chose the order in which we saw patients. As we arrived at our last patient’s room, I snapped out of my under-caffeinated daze and realized I had made the rookie mistake of leaving our newest and sickest patient for last.

The Appeal of Ambulatory Medicine: How to Create More Primary Care Physicians

When I am asked about my future plans, my response is rightfully met with confusion. I am entering the workforce as an academic internal medicine physician devoting my practice entirely to the outpatient setting. Yet, two-thirds of my residency training has been managing patients within the walls of a hospital. That disconnect raises interesting questions about my career choice, and, naturally, makes me an anomaly among my peers.

“PGY3”: How I Coped in the Medical ICU by Making Music

Listen to the track “PGY3” by Dr. Roy Souaid and his band “John Lebanon.” The song started in New Orleans during the American College of Physicians National Conference in May 2018 and has been a yearlong project inspired by street buskers, hospital sounds and jazz. It captures the medical resident’s work flow and is set in the medical intensive care unit at the Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island.

Natasha Khalid, MD Natasha Khalid, MD (2 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Karachi, Pakistan


I work as a resident physician in Pakistan and have written on various mediums for over a decade now. Research and narrative medicine have always been my two major areas of interest and that have helped me channel my inner creativity alongside my mentally and physically exhausting work life. Outside my medicine life, I enjoy reading, traveling and running my blog: @natashablogs.