Internal Medicine

Divya Shankar, MD Divya Shankar, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Boston University School of Medicine


Divya is a second-year internal medicine resident at Boston Medical Center in Boston, MA. She received her BA in Medical Sciences with a minor in Journalism at Boston University and subsequently completed her MD at Boston University School of Medicine. She is passionate about health equity, working with underserved populations, and critical care medicine.




Figure 1. “Relationship between System 1 and System 2 thinking.” Daily encounters lead to the activation of System 1 or System 2 thinking. Problems demanding higher levels of thought either directly or indirectly activate System 2. Repetitive exposure decreases the demand for System 2 thinking and increases both productivity and the risk for error.

Systems-Based Thinking: How Subconscious Thought Affects Medical Decision Making

System-based thinking describes a set of subconscious thought processes aptly named System 1 and System 2. The profession of medicine relies heavily on SBT — the ability to rapidly diagnose, treat, and improvise during stressful situations is dependent on these systems, which develop and mature throughout one’s training.

Top 5 Reasons You Might Want to Work Locum Tenens After Residency

Every job is different, but my experiences so far have drawn a very stark contrast to life as a resident. Now imagine, if you can: you stroll into work at whatever time you want. You round on your patients, write notes and leave. The rest of the day you give verbal orders over the phone while you hang out at the beach.

John Dougherty, MD John Dougherty, MD (1 Posts)

Attending Physician Contributing Writer

Guam Memorial Hospital


John Dougherty went to medical school at Northwestern University and residency at New York University. He is board certified in internal medicine and practices at Guam Memorial Hospital in Tamuning, Guam, and Alaska Native Medical Center in Anchorage, Alaska.