Opinions

Rebecca L. Williams-Karnesky, MD, PhD Rebecca L. Williams-Karnesky, MD, PhD (1 Posts)

Fellow Physician Contributing Writer

University of New Mexico Hospital


Dr. Rebecca Williams-Karnesky has completed three clinical years as a General Surgery resident and is currently in her second year as a Surgical Education Research Fellow in the Department of General Surgery at the University of New Mexico. Her current research examines the intersectionality of surgeon wellness, engagement in teaching, and learner mistreatment. She is also interested in understanding how mindfulness and compassion practices can be used to increase personal resilience and change culture in surgery.




Why Being Kind Matters: Mistreatment of Residents Leads to Increased Rates of Burnout and Suicidal Ideation

Residency is a challenging time plagued by long hours, overwhelming clinical service loads, escalating documentation requirements, and inadequate resources for support. A recently published study in the New England Journal of Medicine illustrates how mistreatment in the training environment takes an additional toll on medical trainees.

Patients, Providers and the Working Class: Lessons for Health Workers from the Closing of Hahnemann Hospital

I had just started my first clerkship of third year at a nearby hospital when the news broke. Hahnemann Hospital, the main teaching hospital of my medical school, was closing. More accurately, the hedge fund manager who purchased the hospital a year earlier was filing for bankruptcy. He separated the valuable Center City real estate from the hospital itself to ensure a tidy profit for investors at the expense of patients and staff.

A Cry for Help: Burning Out as a Resident Physician

During residency, do you ever stop to think why you wanted to become a doctor? What were your reasons? I wish I could remember mine. I could have pursued so many other careers. I used to be a director of a non-profit organization, helping individuals from low socioeconomic backgrounds attain technical skills. I do not recall being at my current level of mental, emotional and physical dysfunctionality while working that job.

In Defense of Resident Wellness (Part 2 of 2)

In my first post in this two-part series, I presented an argument for why physicians and administrators need to work together to develop small-scale interventions to bring meaning to medicine while we continue to push for larger systemic change. In this post, I will explore some effective (and some less effective) themes for interventions for residents.

Solitary Confinement and Health: Why It Matters in 2019

Over the last year, our collective minds have been captivated by stories about child and family separation, detainment of citizens and immigrants, and the quality of the health care within detention facilities. These stories have been jarring and traumatic, and have also awoken an important level of national consciousness about the nature of detention. What has not received as much coverage in recent discourse is the ongoing nature of solitary confinement in our justice system.

JAMA Posts Job for ICE Detention Facility: A Concern for Dual Loyalty

“Philosophically committed to the objectives of the facility,” read the original job posting for a physician by The GEO Group in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). The GEO Group is a for-profit company that runs correctional facilities not just in the United States, but also in the United Kingdom, South Africa and Australia. It also operates several Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) processing centers in the United States.

Children During Medical Training: A Resident Physician’s Experience

My wife and I were preparing to move overseas so I could begin medical school in Israel. We both wanted children young. I grew up as one of five siblings, and we looked forward to a big family. I knew that having kids would change my medical education experience, but I had no idea how grateful I would be for the advice I received that sunny spring day in Alabama.

Resident Physicians as Leaders in TIME’S UP Healthcare: Changing the Narrative for the Next Generation

In 2019, sexual harassment and discrimination in medicine prevent patients from receiving the best possible care. We all deserve better. Not only do all who practice medicine and care for patients deserve an equitable workplace, patients deserve optimal care provided by medical teams in which all members are respected and valued. This is why I’m proud to be a founding member of TIME’S UP Healthcare.

Heather Logghe, MD Heather Logghe, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University


Dr. Logghe is currently a surgical research fellow at Thomas Jefferson University, examining the role of social media in surgical education. As a co-founder of TIMES UP Healthcare, she is dedicated to ensuring an equitable and safe environment for all who give and receive healthcare. This summer she will resume her clinical training as a general surgery intern at the University of Buffalo. She can be found on Twitter at @LoggheMD.