Opinions

Rohit Abraham, MD, MPH Rohit Abraham, MD, MPH (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Boston University Medical Center


Rohit Abraham is a PGY-1 resident in combined Family Medicine & Psychiatry. He is training as a Copello Fellow in health advocacy through Doctors For America. His interests include health policy and care delivery innovations for integrating primary care and behavioral health for urban underserved populations, with an intersectional focus on substance use disorders.




Bosses of Us: Doctors, Administrators, and the Profit Motive

The pandemic points to an important lesson: a rejection of traditional leadership structures, at least those that feed into a profit-based medical system, may be necessary in order to create a different world. The union provides such a framework, vesting power in a collective of voices. But in order to succeed at the level of a union, physicians need to let their voices join that collective — they cannot expect a delegate or representative alone to do the entire job, just as we might expect a program director to guide us in the right direction.

Can Disease Be Tragically Beautiful? A Resident Physician Reflects on COVID-19

Has social distancing paradoxically made us closer? Can disease be tragically beautiful? I pondered these questions as I reminisced over the past few weeks working on one of the medicine floors in my hospital, grappling with these thoughts almost every moment as I have witnessed the world respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Can Empathy Be Taught, or Is It Innate?

In medical school, I was taught to sit at eye level when speaking to patients, ask how they would prefer to be addressed, and ask open-ended questions to allow them to express themselves. I learned to interject with “That must be really difficult for you,” or “I can only imagine how that makes you feel,” as a way to show empathy and foster better connection with patients.

Tears for the Warriors Without Armor in the Fight Against COVID-19

It is difficult to put into words the level of frustration and despair that I have felt over the last few days watching the schizophrenic national response to this COVID-19 crisis and its detrimental effects on the work conditions of my colleagues. As an internal medicine physician working in Utah, it feels like it is the calm before the storm as emergency room and urgent care volumes are down as people try to socially distance to correct the spread of this virus. Other areas of the country are not so lucky.

Facing the Inevitable: A Resident Physician’s Perspective on the COVID-19 Pandemic

As I check in on my patients each morning, I wonder if some will unexpectedly decompensate and die over the coming weeks. I think about myself and my co-residents who are in the hospital all day swabbing patients for COVID-19 without adequate personal protective equipment. Many of my co-residents are on home isolation as a result of this exposure, waiting for their test results and praying that our government will step up and fund more mask production, or civilians will return the N95s they’ve hoarded, or the set of a TV medical drama will donate their props to us.

A View From the Frontline: COVID-19 and the UK Doctors’ Perspective

Earlier last week, one patient had been referred in from their family physician, and the onsite senior resident, Adam, had been the doctor to assess them. Symptoms were vague — generally unwell, off food, bit of a cough, possible headache. Viral swabs were taken, because pretty much anyone that had lately walked through the hospital door with even a suspicion of sepsis now had samples sent off.

Routine Infection Prevention Will Not Contain COVID-19

As an internal medicine resident working at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, COVID-19 has taken over our workroom conversations as the number of new cases enters exponential growth. As an anthropologist who lived in Wuhan for a year and has regularly kept in touch with physicians there since the city was placed under lockdown on January 23, 2020, COVID-19 has proved to be an unprecedented crisis.

Miao J. Hua, MD, PhD Miao J. Hua, MD, PhD (2 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Mount Sinai Hospital


Miao Jenny Hua is a first year internal medicine resident at the Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan. She also has a PhD in anthropology from the University of Chicago. Her dissertation on the integrated Chinese and Western health care system in China took her to spend over a year in Wuhan, China from 2016-2017. Since the lockdown of Wuhan on January 23, 2020, she has been in regular communication with her physician friends at the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic.