Health Policy

David Chiang, MD, PhD David Chiang, MD, PhD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

University of Massachusetts Medical School


David Chiang is a resident physician in Med-Peds. He is an aspiring physician-scientist in immunology and immune regulation with a clinical focus on inflammatory bowel diseases. When not in the hospital, he dabbles in mixology and takes long walks with his dog, Lobo. He is a Ravenclaw.




Medicine-Pediatrics Residents Call for Anti-Racism in Health Care

Recent events have highlighted a systemic problem within our world, our country, our state, and our community. People of color fight an uphill battle in every facet of life, at every socioeconomic level. The COVID-19 pandemic is no exception — as we all know by now, patients from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are disproportionately afflicted. But the spotlight has refocused on a chronic pandemic: systemic racism.

Bosses of Us: Doctors, Administrators, and the Profit Motive

The pandemic points to an important lesson: a rejection of traditional leadership structures, at least those that feed into a profit-based medical system, may be necessary in order to create a different world. The union provides such a framework, vesting power in a collective of voices. But in order to succeed at the level of a union, physicians need to let their voices join that collective — they cannot expect a delegate or representative alone to do the entire job, just as we might expect a program director to guide us in the right direction.

Can Disease Be Tragically Beautiful? A Resident Physician Reflects on COVID-19

Has social distancing paradoxically made us closer? Can disease be tragically beautiful? I pondered these questions as I reminisced over the past few weeks working on one of the medicine floors in my hospital, grappling with these thoughts almost every moment as I have witnessed the world respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Tears for the Warriors Without Armor in the Fight Against COVID-19

It is difficult to put into words the level of frustration and despair that I have felt over the last few days watching the schizophrenic national response to this COVID-19 crisis and its detrimental effects on the work conditions of my colleagues. As an internal medicine physician working in Utah, it feels like it is the calm before the storm as emergency room and urgent care volumes are down as people try to socially distance to correct the spread of this virus. Other areas of the country are not so lucky.

Facing the Inevitable: A Resident Physician’s Perspective on the COVID-19 Pandemic

As I check in on my patients each morning, I wonder if some will unexpectedly decompensate and die over the coming weeks. I think about myself and my co-residents who are in the hospital all day swabbing patients for COVID-19 without adequate personal protective equipment. Many of my co-residents are on home isolation as a result of this exposure, waiting for their test results and praying that our government will step up and fund more mask production, or civilians will return the N95s they’ve hoarded, or the set of a TV medical drama will donate their props to us.

A View From the Frontline: COVID-19 and the UK Doctors’ Perspective

Earlier last week, one patient had been referred in from their family physician, and the onsite senior resident, Adam, had been the doctor to assess them. Symptoms were vague — generally unwell, off food, bit of a cough, possible headache. Viral swabs were taken, because pretty much anyone that had lately walked through the hospital door with even a suspicion of sepsis now had samples sent off.

Routine Infection Prevention Will Not Contain COVID-19

As an internal medicine resident working at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, COVID-19 has taken over our workroom conversations as the number of new cases enters exponential growth. As an anthropologist who lived in Wuhan for a year and has regularly kept in touch with physicians there since the city was placed under lockdown on January 23, 2020, COVID-19 has proved to be an unprecedented crisis.

Ending Inhumane Treatment Within Detention Centers Begins by Bringing Life-Saving Basic Health Care to Patients Within

In America today, history is repeating itself with ardent voices calling for division between “aliens” and “nationals,” instilling an “us” versus “them” mentality. What is happening under our watch is eerily reminiscent of the internment camps of World War II and the separation of individuals based on ethnicity that we have seen throughout history. We have created a climate of widespread fear, detaining immigrants and asylum seekers in abhorrent conditions, without a basic standard of care, and separating parents from children. 

Climate Change is Here: A Pediatrician’s Perspective on the Public Health Crisis

Dakor (Kheda District), Gujarat, India December 1, 2019 Softly and subtly, the rustling of the leaves quickens and a cool breeze sweeps across the town. A child rocks gently on a swing and a father stands in the bazaar bartering for the best value for vegetables for dinner. His wife is hospitalized with hemorrhagic dengue; shivering with fevers that rise and fall as do her blood counts. The surroundings quickly transform from the afternoon’s thick, sweltering …

Shalini Shah, DO Shalini Shah, DO (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

University of Massachusetts Medical School


Shalini Shah is a third year pediatrics resident at the University of Massachusetts in Worcester, MA. She first learned of climate change as an undergraduate and has become increasingly passionate about engaging in this topic over time. She studied medicine at the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine in Maine. She hopes to co​mbine her interests in pediatrics with environmental and population health to engage in climate research and advocacy. Through this column, she aims to share narratives that illustrate the health impacts of climate change in a relatable way.