Internal Medicine

Austin Wesevich, MD, MPH Austin Wesevich, MD, MPH (3 Posts)

Resident Physician Columnist

Duke University Medical Center


Austin is an intern in Duke’s combined Internal Medicine/Pediatrics residency program. After spending the last ten years as a student at Washington University in St. Louis (WashU), minus a one-year stint in Malawi, which he chronicled in his in-Training column, “Lessons in Lilongwe”, Austin is excited to explore a new institution for his residency training. His column provides real-time reflection on the difficulties and small victories of life as a resident and how social support systems and interpersonal connections are critical to that journey. You can follow him @drwesevich.

The Med-Peds Bunch

In light of recent press on resident burnout and depression, The Med-Peds Bunch explores the lived social support systems of a current Duke resident. Come join Austin as he begins his med-peds journey and reflects on feelings of family in residency.




Blood is Thicker Than Water, But What if the Water is Duke Blue?

On Match Day, you are assigned to a new family for the next three to seven years. This will be the city where you might buy your first home, the city where you may meet the people who will speak at your wedding. An algorithm shuffles you into your assigned place in a new family tree.

24 Weeks

Back in that operating room, I am dutifully holding onto the basin just beyond and under the table edge. What I see is what the mother would never wish to see; being a part of her care, we accept that burden for her, and in a much different way that she ever could from her intimate connection with it. It is our service to her, to alleviate that pain, to be an open support to her health and well-being. It is an acceptable cost, but a cost all the same.

Marc Katz, MD Marc Katz, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Drexel University College of Medicine


Marc Katz is a first-year internal medicine resident interested in pursuing a fellowship in cardiology. He writes about the hidden curriculum of medical school and residency and about humanism in medicine.