GME

Xiomara P. Urban, MD Xiomara P. Urban, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Albany Medical College


Xiomara P. Urban M.D. is currently a PGY-III in the General Psychiatry Residency program at Albany Medical Center. She has successfully matched in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at UCSF, and will be starting there in July 2019. At work, she is notable for her enthusiasm, and playful curiosity. This tends to manifest itself with unexpected compliments, and sporadic investigations into changes in their grooming habits. She brings this same energy and inquisitiveness to all her patients regardless of age. Her main interest is in effecting systems of care in order to better serve those they are designed for.




Dear NBME and FSMB, I watch HGTV more than Netflix: A Response to the Invited Commentary on USMLE Step 1

The recent ruminations of Drs. Katsufrakis and Chaudhry in the form of an invited commentary in Academic Medicine, entitled “Improving Residency Selection Requires Close Study and Better Understanding of Stakeholder Needs,” has garnered a significant amount of attention on Twitter. Drs. Katsufrakis and Chaudhry’s commentary was in response to a well-written and well-reasoned article by a group of medical students published in the same journal recommending the USMLE Step 1 transition from a numeric score to pass/fail.

Competition Versus Collaboration in Residency

Now that you, the reader, have become house staff, the time has come to change your mindset from one of competition to one of collaboration with your peers. The path that leads to achieving the MD or DO degree is one of often single-minded pursuit of academic victory. The competition has been fierce.

Doctoring When Someone You Care About is Sick

One of the trickier things to learn as a young doctor is how to navigate boundaries between patient, doctor, family and friends. Medical school teaches us that it is unethical to treat yourself or your close family due to a lack of objectivity that can affect judgement. It is fairly obvious why doing otherwise can create poor medical care due to blind spots created by subjectivity, hope, selective listening, personal agendas, and bias for a certain approach to treatment.

Kusama: On Humanism in Psychiatry

I first heard of Yayoi Kusama last year when her spellbinding exhibit came to the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. Admittedly late to the international zeitgeist of Kusama, what initially drew me in was her story — a Japanese-American avant-garde artist who suffered from severe mental illness and successfully transformed that suffering into riveting artwork.

Jennifer Schwartz, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Drexel University College of Medicine


Jennifer Schwartz, DO is a second-year internal medicine resident at Drexel University College of Medicine. She obtained her BS from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, returning to Philadelphia to attend the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, where she obtained her degree in osteopathic medicine. Schwartz currently serves a resident representative on the Graduate Medical Education Committee and plans to pursue a career in gastroenterology.