Internal Medicine

Beatrice Preti, MD Beatrice Preti, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Queen's University School of Medicine


Beatrice Preti is a PGY-2 resident in internal medicine at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.




Figure 1. “Relationship between System 1 and System 2 thinking.” Daily encounters lead to the activation of System 1 or System 2 thinking. Problems demanding higher levels of thought either directly or indirectly activate System 2. Repetitive exposure decreases the demand for System 2 thinking and increases both productivity and the risk for error.

Systems-Based Thinking: How Subconscious Thought Affects Medical Decision Making

System-based thinking describes a set of subconscious thought processes aptly named System 1 and System 2. The profession of medicine relies heavily on SBT — the ability to rapidly diagnose, treat, and improvise during stressful situations is dependent on these systems, which develop and mature throughout one’s training.

Top 5 Reasons You Might Want to Work Locum Tenens After Residency

Every job is different, but my experiences so far have drawn a very stark contrast to life as a resident. Now imagine, if you can: you stroll into work at whatever time you want. You round on your patients, write notes and leave. The rest of the day you give verbal orders over the phone while you hang out at the beach.

Uncle and Doctor: Terms of Endearment or Old-Fashioned Barriers?

On my first day of intern year, my attending corrected me in the hallway after I introduced myself to a patient by my first name. Following this, I sheepishly adopted a habit of saying “I’m Dr. Last Name” when sticking out my hand to greet a patient. In clinic, the nurses call me “Dr. Last Name,” even when saying a casual hello. When you refer to yourself as a doctor enough times, you start to believe it.

Austin Wesevich, MD, MPH Austin Wesevich, MD, MPH (3 Posts)

Resident Physician Columnist

Duke University Medical Center


Austin is an intern in Duke’s combined Internal Medicine/Pediatrics residency program. After spending the last ten years as a student at Washington University in St. Louis (WashU), minus a one-year stint in Malawi, which he chronicled in his in-Training column, “Lessons in Lilongwe”, Austin is excited to explore a new institution for his residency training. His column provides real-time reflection on the difficulties and small victories of life as a resident and how social support systems and interpersonal connections are critical to that journey. You can follow him @drwesevich.

The Med-Peds Bunch

In light of recent press on resident burnout and depression, The Med-Peds Bunch explores the lived social support systems of a current Duke resident. Come join Austin as he begins his med-peds journey and reflects on feelings of family in residency.