Internal Medicine

Arya Shah, MD Arya Shah, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Brigham and Women's Hospital


I am a PGY-1 psychiatry resident at Brigham and Women's Hospital and a Class of 2018 graduate of the Mayo Clinic School of Medicine. I'm a Los Angeles girl, born and raised. In continuing to pursue creative endeavors, and in working to engage my classmates in the arts, I hope to show people that creative expression can help to keep burnout at bay and help to keep humanism alive in medicine.




Figure 1. “Relationship between System 1 and System 2 thinking.” Daily encounters lead to the activation of System 1 or System 2 thinking. Problems demanding higher levels of thought either directly or indirectly activate System 2. Repetitive exposure decreases the demand for System 2 thinking and increases both productivity and the risk for error.

Systems-Based Thinking: How Subconscious Thought Affects Medical Decision Making

System-based thinking describes a set of subconscious thought processes aptly named System 1 and System 2. The profession of medicine relies heavily on SBT — the ability to rapidly diagnose, treat, and improvise during stressful situations is dependent on these systems, which develop and mature throughout one’s training.

Top 5 Reasons You Might Want to Work Locum Tenens After Residency

Every job is different, but my experiences so far have drawn a very stark contrast to life as a resident. Now imagine, if you can: you stroll into work at whatever time you want. You round on your patients, write notes and leave. The rest of the day you give verbal orders over the phone while you hang out at the beach.

Uncle and Doctor: Terms of Endearment or Old-Fashioned Barriers?

On my first day of intern year, my attending corrected me in the hallway after I introduced myself to a patient by my first name. Following this, I sheepishly adopted a habit of saying “I’m Dr. Last Name” when sticking out my hand to greet a patient. In clinic, the nurses call me “Dr. Last Name,” even when saying a casual hello. When you refer to yourself as a doctor enough times, you start to believe it.

Katharine Lawrence MD, MPH Katharine Lawrence MD, MPH (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

New York University, Langone


Katharine Lawrence is an Internal Medicine resident at New York University School of Medicine, specializing in primary care. She received her BA in Anthropology from Vassar College, and her MPH from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. She attended FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine (HWCOM) in Miami, FL. As an advocate for the LGBT community, Katharine has spoken at the local, regional, and national level on the importance of incorporating LGBT health in medical education. Katharine’s writing has been featured in a number of publications and blogs, including Hektoen International, the AAMC AM Rounds, KevinMD, and In-Training.