Internal Medicine

Romela Petrosyan, MD (2 Posts)

Managing Editor

University of South Carolina School of Medicine - Greenville


Romela is an Internal Medicine resident physician at Greenville Health System. She was born in Yerevan, Armenia and grew up in Moscow, Russia until the age of 15 at which point she immigrated to the United States. She is quadrilingual and has completed her undergraduate education at the University of California, Irvine with Summa Cum Laude and Phi Beta Kappa in Biological Sciences. Romela is a graduate from University of Central Florida College of Medicine and has extensive experience in clinical research, medical education development, publication, and community service. In her free time, she enjoys cross-fit, long-distance running, painting, and choreographing.




Figure 1. “Relationship between System 1 and System 2 thinking.” Daily encounters lead to the activation of System 1 or System 2 thinking. Problems demanding higher levels of thought either directly or indirectly activate System 2. Repetitive exposure decreases the demand for System 2 thinking and increases both productivity and the risk for error.

Systems-Based Thinking: How Subconscious Thought Affects Medical Decision Making

System-based thinking describes a set of subconscious thought processes aptly named System 1 and System 2. The profession of medicine relies heavily on SBT — the ability to rapidly diagnose, treat, and improvise during stressful situations is dependent on these systems, which develop and mature throughout one’s training.

Top 5 Reasons You Might Want to Work Locum Tenens After Residency

Every job is different, but my experiences so far have drawn a very stark contrast to life as a resident. Now imagine, if you can: you stroll into work at whatever time you want. You round on your patients, write notes and leave. The rest of the day you give verbal orders over the phone while you hang out at the beach.

Uncle and Doctor: Terms of Endearment or Old-Fashioned Barriers?

On my first day of intern year, my attending corrected me in the hallway after I introduced myself to a patient by my first name. Following this, I sheepishly adopted a habit of saying “I’m Dr. Last Name” when sticking out my hand to greet a patient. In clinic, the nurses call me “Dr. Last Name,” even when saying a casual hello. When you refer to yourself as a doctor enough times, you start to believe it.

Matt Lorenz, MD Matt Lorenz, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Brown University


Matt is an internal medicine-pediatrics resident at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. A former teacher in Spain, he is passionate about issues related to global health and medical education. He grew up in Tennessee, but his adopted home lies in Andalucía.