Clinical

Cramer McCullen, MD, MPH Cramer McCullen, MD, MPH (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

University of Pennsylvania


Cramer is a current PGY-1 in Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Pennsylvania Hospitals in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He attended the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and the Gillings School of Public Health where he received his MD and MPH, respectively. He additionally received a graduate certificate in LGBT Health Policy and Practice from George Washington University. He obtained his Bachelor of Arts in Spanish and Medicine, Health, & Society from Vanderbilt University. Cramer was born and raised in Charlotte, North Carolina.

The opinions expressed in this article do not represent those of the University of Pennsylvania Health System or the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.




From Transphobia to Charlottesville: The Health Impact of the Tweeter-in-Chief

On July 26, President Donald Trump released another polemic tweet informing the public that “the United States Government will not accept or allow Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the US military,” citing the “tremendous medical costs” that transgender individuals pose to the health system.

Lessons in Medicine, From the Car Dealership

I distinctly remember my drive to the hospital for the first shift of my residency five years ago. It was a night shift, a fact that only added to my trepidation. My brain bounced frantically back and forth among a random assortment of topics of which I lacked, I felt, sufficient knowledge, but which knowledge I felt sure I would imminently be called upon to use in a critical situation.

Blood is Thicker Than Water, But What if the Water is Duke Blue?

On Match Day, you are assigned to a new family for the next three to seven years. This will be the city where you might buy your first home, the city where you may meet the people who will speak at your wedding. An algorithm shuffles you into your assigned place in a new family tree.

24 Weeks

Back in that operating room, I am dutifully holding onto the basin just beyond and under the table edge. What I see is what the mother would never wish to see; being a part of her care, we accept that burden for her, and in a much different way that she ever could from her intimate connection with it. It is our service to her, to alleviate that pain, to be an open support to her health and well-being. It is an acceptable cost, but a cost all the same.

Pamela Petersen, MD Pamela Petersen, MD (1 Posts)

Fellow Physician Contributing Writer

Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin


Pamela is currently completing her fellowship training in Pediatric Critical Care at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. She has always used writing as an outlet and was inspired at a young age by personal experiences to join the field of medicine. With a keen interest in technology, she completed her undergraduate training at the Milwaukee School of Engineering, earning her B.S. in Biomedical Engineering. She then went on to complete her medical doctorate at the Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Franklin University. In pediatric critical care she has found the perfect melding of her interests in technology and medicine and hopes to be a part of designing the critical care unit of the future. Pamela believes that in medicine especially, reminders of the humanism that inspires people to begin the journey of medical training are essential to becoming the type of physician we all would want treating our own families.