Opinions

Manasa Mouli, MD Manasa Mouli, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Tufts University School of Medicine


Manasa is a PGY-2 resident physician in internal medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine.




How You Die: When Patients Are in Prison

“Direct Admit: bounceback 72M recurrent pleural effusion, new diplopia,” my pager beeped with our new admission. As a “bounceback” admission, this 72-year-old male would be returning to our service after recently discharging from the hospital. This type of admission often indicates that a problem recurred or an issue was not fully addressed during the most recent hospitalization.

Skip the Jargon and Talk to Your Patient

I remember ranting to a friend one night about the terminology, lingo and semantics that run through medicine. When I started studying medicine, I found the language fascinating. Most physicians seem to appreciate the language of medicine because truly understanding it is proof that after years of studying, working, and putting nose to grindstone, you made it in to the exclusive club that utilizes this jargon.

Pursuing “Right Care”: A Lown Experience

In April, I had the pleasure of attending the 4th Annual Lown Institute Conference in Chicago. The Lown Institute was named after and inspired by Dr. Bernard Lown, a renowned cardiologist who also championed social change by co-founding the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, an organization to prevent nuclear war during the Cold War. The theme of the conference was promoting “right care” by addressing overuse, underuse and misuse of medical services through a coalition of patient advocates, community organizers and medical professionals.

In Defense of Step 2 Clinical Skills

In the past two months, a group of Harvard medical students have launched the “End Step 2 CS” campaign, an effort to do away with the portion of the U.S. Medical Licensing Exam that tests clinical and communications skills in a hands-on, day-long clinic simulation using standardized patients. Not only is the Step 2 CS exam a necessary public safeguard, it has greatly strengthened the curriculum of medical schools nationwide.

Is Graduate Medical Training Making Doctors Afraid of Procedures?

It’s 2 a.m., and the patient’s blood pressure is beginning to rapidly decrease. Every IV line is occupied by an antibiotic or IV fluids, and we are in need of a vasoactive medication. The nurse comes to my computer and sternly states, “We can no longer avoid it. I think the patient needs a central line.” I quickly say “okay,” but I don’t move. I am momentarily frozen by my unease with the bedside procedure ahead.

Female Leaders in Medicine: It’s Lonely at the Top

I recently recreated a now-famous business school study on a subset of residents in my internal medicine residency program. In the original study, researchers asked students to read a case of the real-life venture capitalist Heidi Roizen, who expertly leveraged an extensive professional network to forward her career. Half of the students read the original case; half were given a case in which Heidi’s name was switched to Howard — a fictional male persona.

The Importance of Palliative Care in Surgery

In an ideal world we would all die at home with our loved ones caring for us, slowly slipping away in our sleep into the placid beyond. But why doesn’t it happen this way? There’s a dignity to that way because of its organic simplicity. It’s how people used to die prior to modern medicine and before we started needing to always “fix the problem.”

Adrienne Bruce, MD Adrienne Bruce, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

University of Pennsylvania


Adrienne is a graduating fourth-year medical student at Georgetown who will be starting residency in general surgery at the University of Pennsylvania. She is interested in surgical oncology and is passionate about the role that palliative care can have for the multi-disciplinary care of oncologic surgery patients.