Opinions

Joseph Lee, MD, MAT Joseph Lee, MD, MAT (2 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital


Dr. Joseph Bokum Lee is currently a pediatric resident and dual Masters of Public Policy candidate at the University of Chicago, where he serves as a representative on the Diversity and Inclusion Trainee Committee, while also on the executive boards of the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Medical Association, and Illinois State Medical Society. Joseph also held the position of community representative of the Northside College Preparatory High School Local School Council; and founded the Road Less Traveled Fund, a non for profit that provides vehicles to single parents to better their lives. For his work, he has been featured on ABC7 Chicago Salutes. Lastly, Joseph volunteers his time with the BEST basketball and Asian Americans for Advancing Justice organizations.

In 2015, Joseph graduated from Rush Medical College, where he sat on a diversity council to help increase the number of underrepresented minorities at Rush and was a national board member for the Asian Pacific American Medical Student Association. While a medical student, he inducted into the Gold Humanism Honors Society, and was awarded with the National Medical Fellowship’s Dr. David Monash/John Caldwell Scott Medical Student Scholarship, the Rush University Student Diversity and Inclusion Award and Mortar Board National Honor’s Society’s Emerging Leaders Award.

In 2011, Joseph received an MAT from Dominican University, concurrently teaching 7th and 8th grade students at Parkside Community Academy in the south side of Chicago through a program called Teach for America. For his efforts, he has been featured on CNN and the Chicago Tribune.

In 2009, Joseph graduated Northwestern University with a BA in psychology and received the Outstanding Achievement in Asian American Studies Award. He also led the Club Basketball Team, the Asian Pacific American Coalition, Habitat for Humanity, and the America Reads program.




The Paradox of Medical Triumphs

As we discharge another patient from the intensive care unit, we celebrate a job well done. “Can you believe how far she’s come in the past few weeks?” or “I didn’t think he would be able to go home so soon.” With the use of modern technological advancements, we are able to bypass the heart and lungs of patients, and push the limits of life to as early as 22 weeks gestation.

Eggo Waffles, Empathy, and Caring for Our Veterans

As a child of immigrant parents, I had limited exposure to the American military. Ironically, my sole memory of the American military exists outside of America — in Japan. I spent part of my childhood in Tokyo and fondly recall the excitement that came from visiting the American Naval Base in Yokosuka to buy “American groceries,” specifically Eggo waffles.

How You Die: When Patients Are in Prison

“Direct Admit: bounceback 72M recurrent pleural effusion, new diplopia,” my pager beeped with our new admission. As a “bounceback” admission, this 72-year-old male would be returning to our service after recently discharging from the hospital. This type of admission often indicates that a problem recurred or an issue was not fully addressed during the most recent hospitalization.

Skip the Jargon and Talk to Your Patient

I remember ranting to a friend one night about the terminology, lingo and semantics that run through medicine. When I started studying medicine, I found the language fascinating. Most physicians seem to appreciate the language of medicine because truly understanding it is proof that after years of studying, working, and putting nose to grindstone, you made it in to the exclusive club that utilizes this jargon.

Pursuing “Right Care”: A Lown Experience

In April, I had the pleasure of attending the 4th Annual Lown Institute Conference in Chicago. The Lown Institute was named after and inspired by Dr. Bernard Lown, a renowned cardiologist who also championed social change by co-founding the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, an organization to prevent nuclear war during the Cold War. The theme of the conference was promoting “right care” by addressing overuse, underuse and misuse of medical services through a coalition of patient advocates, community organizers and medical professionals.

In Defense of Step 2 Clinical Skills

In the past two months, a group of Harvard medical students have launched the “End Step 2 CS” campaign, an effort to do away with the portion of the U.S. Medical Licensing Exam that tests clinical and communications skills in a hands-on, day-long clinic simulation using standardized patients. Not only is the Step 2 CS exam a necessary public safeguard, it has greatly strengthened the curriculum of medical schools nationwide.

Ken Simons, MD Ken Simons, MD (1 Posts)

Attending Physician Guest Writer

Medical College of Wisconsin


Ken Simons, MD serves as the Senior Associate Dean for Graduate Medical Education and Accreditation at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, WI. A medical graduate of Boston University, he then completed his residency and fellowship training in Ophthalmology at The University of North Carolina School of Medicine and Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of California-LA, respectively.