Opinions

Juliana E. Morris, MD, EdM Juliana E. Morris, MD, EdM (2 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

University of California San Francisco


Juliana is a PGY-2 resident in Family and Community Medicine at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF).




Restricted Movement and Health in Palestine

I knew what was coming before it happened. She was looking up at the ring of white coats encircling her hospital bed, eyes darting from side to side to follow the sequence of their voices when suddenly, her lower lip began to quiver. And with her quivering lip, her breaths came faster and she sucked in deep gulps of air between her pleading questions. But soon the pack was headed on to the next patient on rounds. She was left alone, and the tears rolled freely.

Disparity in Medicine: A Reflection by a Minority Physician and Neonatologist

I was one of only eight African-American students in my medical school class of 214, and now I am a part of the less than four percent of African-American physicians in this country. My personal and professional experiences have further invigorated my passionate interest in public health and to explore effective strategies to reduce health disparities for minority populations in the United States.

The Paradox of Medical Triumphs

As we discharge another patient from the intensive care unit, we celebrate a job well done. “Can you believe how far she’s come in the past few weeks?” or “I didn’t think he would be able to go home so soon.” With the use of modern technological advancements, we are able to bypass the heart and lungs of patients, and push the limits of life to as early as 22 weeks gestation.

Eggo Waffles, Empathy, and Caring for Our Veterans

As a child of immigrant parents, I had limited exposure to the American military. Ironically, my sole memory of the American military exists outside of America — in Japan. I spent part of my childhood in Tokyo and fondly recall the excitement that came from visiting the American Naval Base in Yokosuka to buy “American groceries,” specifically Eggo waffles.

How You Die: When Patients Are in Prison

“Direct Admit: bounceback 72M recurrent pleural effusion, new diplopia,” my pager beeped with our new admission. As a “bounceback” admission, this 72-year-old male would be returning to our service after recently discharging from the hospital. This type of admission often indicates that a problem recurred or an issue was not fully addressed during the most recent hospitalization.

Skip the Jargon and Talk to Your Patient

I remember ranting to a friend one night about the terminology, lingo and semantics that run through medicine. When I started studying medicine, I found the language fascinating. Most physicians seem to appreciate the language of medicine because truly understanding it is proof that after years of studying, working, and putting nose to grindstone, you made it in to the exclusive club that utilizes this jargon.

Joseph Laratta, MD Joseph Laratta, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Columbia University


Dr. Laratta is currently one of the chief residents at the Columbia University Department of Orthopaedic Surgery in New York City. He completed his undergraduate education at the University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, where he graduated with highest distinction. He continued onto medical school in his home state of New Jersey at Rutgers University New Jersey Medical School, where he finished in the top 5% of his class. In the upcoming year, Dr. Laratta will begin his fellowship training in Neurosurgical and Orthopaedic Spine Surgery at the Norton Leatherman Spine Center in Louisville, KY.