Intern Year

Austin Wesevich, MD, MPH Austin Wesevich, MD, MPH (3 Posts)

Resident Physician Columnist

Duke University Medical Center


Austin is an intern in Duke’s combined Internal Medicine/Pediatrics residency program. After spending the last ten years as a student at Washington University in St. Louis (WashU), minus a one-year stint in Malawi, which he chronicled in his in-Training column, “Lessons in Lilongwe”, Austin is excited to explore a new institution for his residency training. His column provides real-time reflection on the difficulties and small victories of life as a resident and how social support systems and interpersonal connections are critical to that journey. You can follow him @drwesevich.

The Med-Peds Bunch

In light of recent press on resident burnout and depression, The Med-Peds Bunch explores the lived social support systems of a current Duke resident. Come join Austin as he begins his med-peds journey and reflects on feelings of family in residency.




Uncle and Doctor: Terms of Endearment or Old-Fashioned Barriers?

On my first day of intern year, my attending corrected me in the hallway after I introduced myself to a patient by my first name. Following this, I sheepishly adopted a habit of saying “I’m Dr. Last Name” when sticking out my hand to greet a patient. In clinic, the nurses call me “Dr. Last Name,” even when saying a casual hello. When you refer to yourself as a doctor enough times, you start to believe it.

Lessons in Medicine, From the Car Dealership

I distinctly remember my drive to the hospital for the first shift of my residency five years ago. It was a night shift, a fact that only added to my trepidation. My brain bounced frantically back and forth among a random assortment of topics of which I lacked, I felt, sufficient knowledge, but which knowledge I felt sure I would imminently be called upon to use in a critical situation.

Blood is Thicker Than Water, But What if the Water is Duke Blue?

On Match Day, you are assigned to a new family for the next three to seven years. This will be the city where you might buy your first home, the city where you may meet the people who will speak at your wedding. An algorithm shuffles you into your assigned place in a new family tree.

Morgan Shier, MD Morgan Shier, MD (2 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Providence Hood River Memorial Hospital


Morgan is a family medicine resident at Providence Hood River Memorial Hospital in Hood River, OR. Her interests include the social determinants of health, rural medicine, and women's health. Outside of medicine, she enjoys writing, traveling, and nature.