Health Policy

Kevin Chun, MD Kevin Chun, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center


Kevin studied Public Health and History at Johns Hopkins University. He then stayed in Baltimore for another 4 years to finish medical school at University of Maryland School of Medicine. He is currently a second year psychiatry resident at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, NH.




A Modest Proposal: There is No Substitute for Time in Medicine

Physician burnout has emerged as an increasingly concerning phenomenon in medicine. As high as 51% of physicians in a Medscape survey report symptoms of burnout. Doctors face higher demands with less time and support. Academic medical centers, which historically have been insulated from outside forces, are now seeing larger patient censuses, leaving less time for physicians to work through each patient’s case carefully.

From Transphobia to Charlottesville: The Health Impact of the Tweeter-in-Chief

On July 26, President Donald Trump released another polemic tweet informing the public that “the United States Government will not accept or allow Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the US military,” citing the “tremendous medical costs” that transgender individuals pose to the health system.

A Day at 34 Haverhill Street Clinic: A Resident’s Education in Social Medicine at Community Health Centers

Ana sits on the exam table in front of me explaining how, in three short weeks, her mother will evict her from her childhood home. She is eight months pregnant and is studying night courses to become a paralegal. As her prenatal provider and primary care physician, I have been sending referrals to numerous community agencies in hopes of securing housing at the local YWCA.

Partnerships for Health: Leveraging and Centralizing Access to Community Health Centers

Health and wellness are more than a simple product of access and initiative, as such a simplified formula is only enjoyed by a very small minority. The equation becomes more complicated as new factors enter, such as unemployment or housing insecurity. Despite their importance as determinants of health, such elements are seldom addressed in the medical interaction between patient and physician, and are thus discarded in the interest of a perceived efficiency.

Reproductive Justice: Physician Voices Can Make a Difference

As I contemplate the future of our country, the future of medicine and the future of reproductive health and justice, I am truly frightened of what is to come. Since our president appears to base his desires on what makes him popular, I fear that he will gut Planned Parenthood, turn over Roe v Wade, and make it even more difficult for women to afford and access care, all in the name of ego.

Domestic Violence and the Physician’s Responsibility

Physicians must begin to view domestic violence as we do influenza or vehicle safety. We must prevent it at all costs. And if it is not prevented, we must aggressively treat it. This will require extensive collaboration with colleagues, public health services and law enforcement. Though the challenge is enormous, physicians ought to address this societal disease and be at the forefront of care.

Pursuing “Right Care”: A Lown Experience

In April, I had the pleasure of attending the 4th Annual Lown Institute Conference in Chicago. The Lown Institute was named after and inspired by Dr. Bernard Lown, a renowned cardiologist who also championed social change by co-founding the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, an organization to prevent nuclear war during the Cold War. The theme of the conference was promoting “right care” by addressing overuse, underuse and misuse of medical services through a coalition of patient advocates, community organizers and medical professionals.

In Defense of Step 2 Clinical Skills

In the past two months, a group of Harvard medical students have launched the “End Step 2 CS” campaign, an effort to do away with the portion of the U.S. Medical Licensing Exam that tests clinical and communications skills in a hands-on, day-long clinic simulation using standardized patients. Not only is the Step 2 CS exam a necessary public safeguard, it has greatly strengthened the curriculum of medical schools nationwide.

Ken Simons, MD Ken Simons, MD (1 Posts)

Attending Physician Guest Writer

Medical College of Wisconsin


Ken Simons, MD serves as the Senior Associate Dean for Graduate Medical Education and Accreditation at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, WI. A medical graduate of Boston University, he then completed his residency and fellowship training in Ophthalmology at The University of North Carolina School of Medicine and Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of California-LA, respectively.