GME

Amanda Pannu, MD Amanda Pannu, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry


Dr. Amanda Pannu is a PGY-4 Chief Resident at the University of Rochester Family Medicine Residency Program. For the past 2 years, she has served as the Resident Representative on the ACGME Review Committee of Family Medicine. She is passionate about education and resident wellbeing. She will be joining The Ohio State University as a core faculty member this summer.




Kusama: On Humanism in Psychiatry

I first heard of Yayoi Kusama last year when her spellbinding exhibit came to the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. Admittedly late to the international zeitgeist of Kusama, what initially drew me in was her story — a Japanese-American avant-garde artist who suffered from severe mental illness and successfully transformed that suffering into riveting artwork.

Perspectives of Women in Orthopaedic Surgery on Leadership Development

Over the past 50 years, the demographics of medical school graduates in the United States has changed dramatically with the number of women (47%) almost equaling the number of men in 2014. However, the Association of American Medical Colleges reports that out of all the sub-specialties, orthopaedic surgery has the lowest proportion of female residents, instructors, assistant, associate, and full professors.

Lessons in Medicine, From the Car Dealership

I distinctly remember my drive to the hospital for the first shift of my residency five years ago. It was a night shift, a fact that only added to my trepidation. My brain bounced frantically back and forth among a random assortment of topics of which I lacked, I felt, sufficient knowledge, but which knowledge I felt sure I would imminently be called upon to use in a critical situation.

How Does a Doctor Become Competent? (Part 2 of 3)

In medical school, competence was defined by studying the course pack, that stack of crucial lecture notes, and memorizing the details therein. Especially in the first two years, my classmates and I spent virtually all of our waking hours reading text books, attending lectures, highlighting and underlining every word of the course material because we were told that all of it, every word, was important. This understanding of competence reflected the clear but unspoken end game: to have the best score on the exam possible, or at least a better score than the other half of the class.

Jarna Shah, MD Jarna Shah, MD (3 Posts)

Editor-in-Chief

University of Illinois at Chicago Hospital


Jarna Shah is a third year anesthesiology resident at University of Illinois at Chicago. She has been an editor with in-Training since 2012. In her free time, she bakes ridiculous desserts, practices martial arts, and writes novels every November.