Clinical

Pooja Lakshmin, MD Pooja Lakshmin, MD (1 Posts)

Attending Physician Guest Writer

George Washington University School of Medicine


Dr. Pooja Lakshmin is an attending psychiatrist and Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the George Washington University School of Medicine. She specializes in women’s mental health and perinatal psychiatry. She is interested in gender, stigma and studying the experiences of women who suffer from depression and anxiety. She is passionate about humanism in medicine. She can be found on twitter @PoojaLakshmin and on her blog www.poojalakshmin.com.




Kusama: On Humanism in Psychiatry

I first heard of Yayoi Kusama last year when her spellbinding exhibit came to the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. Admittedly late to the international zeitgeist of Kusama, what initially drew me in was her story — a Japanese-American avant-garde artist who suffered from severe mental illness and successfully transformed that suffering into riveting artwork.

Gunshot Victims Rushed to the Emergency Room: What It’s Like to Be Their Doctor

It seems that each week we learn of a new mass shooting. Gunfire from a legally-purchased AR-15 assault rifle hits innocent high school students, nightclub patrons, and mall-goers. A politician reassures the nation that our brave first responders are bringing the victims to a nearby hospital. The media’s report to the public generally ends, but when I hear “trauma team to ED STAT,” my work only just begins.

Top 5 Reasons You Might Want to Work Locum Tenens After Residency

Every job is different, but my experiences so far have drawn a very stark contrast to life as a resident. Now imagine, if you can: you stroll into work at whatever time you want. You round on your patients, write notes and leave. The rest of the day you give verbal orders over the phone while you hang out at the beach.

Uncle and Doctor: Terms of Endearment or Old-Fashioned Barriers?

On my first day of intern year, my attending corrected me in the hallway after I introduced myself to a patient by my first name. Following this, I sheepishly adopted a habit of saying “I’m Dr. Last Name” when sticking out my hand to greet a patient. In clinic, the nurses call me “Dr. Last Name,” even when saying a casual hello. When you refer to yourself as a doctor enough times, you start to believe it.

Matt Lorenz, MD Matt Lorenz, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Brown University


Matt is an internal medicine-pediatrics resident at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. A former teacher in Spain, he is passionate about issues related to global health and medical education. He grew up in Tennessee, but his adopted home lies in Andalucía.