Clinical

David Louis, MD David Louis, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Contributing Writer

Brown University


David was born and raised in Parsippany, New Jersey. He obtained his Bachelors of Science in Microbiology at New Mexico State University followed by both his Masters in Biomedical Science (MBS) and Doctor of Medicine (MD) from Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. He is currently an Internal Medicine resident at Brown University, where he has invested himself in clinical research regarding coronary and peripheral artery revascularization, He is pursuing a career in interventional cardiology.




Figure 1. “Relationship between System 1 and System 2 thinking.” Daily encounters lead to the activation of System 1 or System 2 thinking. Problems demanding higher levels of thought either directly or indirectly activate System 2. Repetitive exposure decreases the demand for System 2 thinking and increases both productivity and the risk for error.

Systems-Based Thinking: How Subconscious Thought Affects Medical Decision Making

System-based thinking describes a set of subconscious thought processes aptly named System 1 and System 2. The profession of medicine relies heavily on SBT — the ability to rapidly diagnose, treat, and improvise during stressful situations is dependent on these systems, which develop and mature throughout one’s training.

A Modest Proposal: There is No Substitute for Time in Medicine

Physician burnout has emerged as an increasingly concerning phenomenon in medicine. As high as 51% of physicians in a Medscape survey report symptoms of burnout. Doctors face higher demands with less time and support. Academic medical centers, which historically have been insulated from outside forces, are now seeing larger patient censuses, leaving less time for physicians to work through each patient’s case carefully.

Kusama: On Humanism in Psychiatry

I first heard of Yayoi Kusama last year when her spellbinding exhibit came to the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. Admittedly late to the international zeitgeist of Kusama, what initially drew me in was her story — a Japanese-American avant-garde artist who suffered from severe mental illness and successfully transformed that suffering into riveting artwork.

Gunshot Victims Rushed to the Emergency Room: What It’s Like to Be Their Doctor

It seems that each week we learn of a new mass shooting. Gunfire from a legally-purchased AR-15 assault rifle hits innocent high school students, nightclub patrons, and mall-goers. A politician reassures the nation that our brave first responders are bringing the victims to a nearby hospital. The media’s report to the public generally ends, but when I hear “trauma team to ED STAT,” my work only just begins.

Top 5 Reasons You Might Want to Work Locum Tenens After Residency

Every job is different, but my experiences so far have drawn a very stark contrast to life as a resident. Now imagine, if you can: you stroll into work at whatever time you want. You round on your patients, write notes and leave. The rest of the day you give verbal orders over the phone while you hang out at the beach.

John Dougherty, MD John Dougherty, MD (1 Posts)

Attending Physician Contributing Writer

Guam Memorial Hospital


John Dougherty went to medical school at Northwestern University and residency at New York University. He is board certified in internal medicine and practices at Guam Memorial Hospital in Tamuning, Guam, and Alaska Native Medical Center in Anchorage, Alaska.